PDF KINDLE (Lanark A Life in Four Books) BY Alasdair Gray

  • Hardcover
  • 576
  • Lanark A Life in Four Books
  • Alasdair Gray
  • English
  • 18 September 2019
  • 9781841951201

Alasdair Gray ☆ 5 Free download

Free download Lanark A Life in Four Books ä PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB free The second half of the 20th century Its playful narrative techniues convey a profound message p. I wanted very much to love this book which was probably my first mistake I had heard a lot of extremely complimentary things about how it was the most unusual eccentric and meaningful novel various people had read for ages and I probably came to it with rather exaggerated hopes Anyway it s good but it s also flawed as to be fair the author himself admits in a rather interesting confessional Epilogue The first thing you notice when you open it up and check out the Contents page is that it is structured in a weird way First comes Book 3 then the Introduction then Books 1 and 2 and finally Book 4 The Epilogue I mentioned comes a few chapters before the end of the book because it s far too important to leave to the end paraphrasing from memory So straight away you know you re dealing with a writer who s kind of pretentious and the only uestion really is if it s justified by artistic effect or if it s just a gimmick On balance it just about worked for me but it was a close callThere are two stories in Lanark which are related in obscure ways to one another Books 1 and 2 tell the story of Duncan Thaw an asthmatic intellectual child growing up in Glasgow and finding his feet as an artist Books 3 and 4 concern a man called Lanark who finds himself in the strange other worldly city of Unthank a place with no sunlight where people mutate into dragons or are devoured by mouths in the ground Unthank is very much a hellish vision of Glasgow and there is than a hint that Lanark himself is really Duncan Thaw trapped in his own personal hell Thaw s narrative ends as he walks out into the sea and Lanark arrives in Unthank with seashells and sand in his pocketsOf course you put this together only gradually since you start by reading Book 3 and only get to Thaw later on One of the problems with the book is the growing suspicion that Gray just had a couple of mediocre novellas and tried to put them together with some stylistic fireworks to make one Big Novel But despite my occassional feelings of irritation in actual fact some of my favourite moments in the book were some of the most contrived like the section where Lanark meets the author Alastair Gray himself who explains exactly what future is about to be written for him It s very neatly handled But while the Lanark story provides lots of weird and fascinating encounters the Duncan Thaw narrative inevitably just seems a bit humdrum and dreary in comparison I must have read a hundred books about asthmatic intellectual children growing up having no success with girls and trying to make themselves into artists This one is no different it s largely modelled on Portrait of the Artist only without the happy ending I found myself having no sympathy with either Thaw or Lanark and I was frustrated by their inability to form decent relationships with people around them How s this for the worst written sex scene I ve come across for many months Softly sadly he revisited the hills and hollows of a familiar landscape the sides of his limbs touching sweet abundances with surprisingly hard tips his endings paddling in the pleats of a wet wound which opened into a boggy cave where little moans bloomed like violets in the blackness There were dank odours and even a whiff of dungEverywhere there is this detachment this cold observational uality to the writing which was integral to the characters but which ultimately stopped me really engaging with the novel It s a shame because Book 3 with which the novel opens is a brilliant start and sadly the rest of the work never uite lives up to the exuberance and originality of those first few chapters I feel like some people may enjoy this than I did so if people are thinking of checking it out I d tell them to go for it and I d love to hear any of your experiences with it But it didn t uite come together for me Sri Dasam Granth Sahib you open it up and check out the Contents page is that it is structured in a weird way First comes Book 3 then the Introduction then Books 1 and 2 and finally Book 4 The Epilogue I mentioned comes a few chapters before the end of the book because it s far too important to leave to the end paraphrasing from memory So straight away Down a Narrow Path you know Radical Reconstruction you re dealing with a writer who s kind of pretentious and the only uestion really is if it s justified by artistic effect or if it s just a gimmick On balance it just about worked for me but it was a close callThere are two stories in Lanark which are related in obscure ways to one another Books 1 and 2 tell the story of Duncan Thaw an asthmatic intellectual child growing up in Glasgow and finding his feet as an artist Books 3 and 4 concern a man called Lanark who finds himself in the strange other worldly city of Unthank a place with no sunlight where people mutate into dragons or are devoured by mouths in the ground Unthank is very much a hellish vision of Glasgow and there is than a hint that Lanark himself is really Duncan Thaw trapped in his own personal hell Thaw s narrative ends as he walks out into the sea and Lanark arrives in Unthank with seashells and sand in his pocketsOf course Sweet Retribution Rydeville Elite #3 you put this together only gradually since The Analogy Book of Related Words Your Secret Shortcut to Power Writing you start by reading Book 3 and only get to Thaw later on One of the problems with the book is the growing suspicion that Gray just had a couple of mediocre novellas and tried to put them together with some stylistic fireworks to make one Big Novel But despite my occassional feelings of irritation in actual fact some of my favourite moments in the book were some of the most contrived like the section where Lanark meets the author Alastair Gray himself who explains exactly what future is about to be written for him It s very neatly handled But while the Lanark story provides lots of weird and fascinating encounters the Duncan Thaw narrative inevitably just seems a bit humdrum and dreary in comparison I must have read a hundred books about asthmatic intellectual children growing up having no success with girls and trying to make themselves into artists This one is no different it s largely modelled on Portrait of the Artist only without the happy ending I found myself having no sympathy with either Thaw or Lanark and I was frustrated by their inability to form decent relationships with people around them How s this for the worst written sex scene I ve come across for many months Softly sadly he revisited the hills and hollows of a familiar landscape the sides of his limbs touching sweet abundances with surprisingly hard tips his endings paddling in the pleats of a wet wound which opened into a boggy cave where little moans bloomed like violets in the blackness There were dank odours and even a whiff of dungEverywhere there is this detachment this cold observational uality to the writing which was integral to the characters but which ultimately stopped me really engaging with the novel It s a shame because Book 3 with which the novel opens is a brilliant start and sadly the rest of the work never uite lives up to the exuberance and originality of those first few chapters I feel like some people may enjoy this than I did so if people are thinking of checking it out I d tell them to go for it and I d love to hear any of Akademie X: Lessons in Art + Life your experiences with it But it didn t uite come together for me

Free download Lanark A Life in Four BooksLanark A Life in Four Books

Free download Lanark A Life in Four Books ä PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB free Ersonal and political about humankind's inability to love and yet our compulsion to go on trying. This novel is a mix of dystopia with fantasy elements and bildungsroman We start in the future where we come across a dysfunctional group of pseudo cognoscenti hanging out in a local cinema cum coffee shop called The Elite In this section of the book Lanark our hero lives a rather purposeless life in Unthank parallel universe Glasgow cavorts with these layabouts there before being sucked underground by a giant pair of lips There he enters a vast Orwellian compound known as The Institute where everyone s a doctor or becomes one He saves a woman Rima one of the layabouts from turning salamander He discovers that Soylent Green is people and for that reason decides to leave the subterreanean Institute and return to the hell of life on the surface of the earth But before doing so he is told the story of his former life as one Duncan Thaw by a portable oracle Thaw lived in the real Glasgow which I was pleased to see meticulously described for the first time in any fiction that I have ever read Over than 300 pages Thaw grows from child to neurotic art student He has terrible asthma He masturbates avidly He can t get a girl His mother dies horribly His relationship with his father is deeply moving The relationships throughout these two central books are so genuine so vivid This human warmth is an element lacking from the framing dystopia because that setting and all its whacky goings on distract from the humanity as it s meant to do But the dystopic sections are valuable for other reasons for their depiction of vast illogical space of an incomprehensible and deeply criminal military industrial complex that will stop at nothing to realize a profit Multiple rereadings are merited That s high praise A masterpiece There I ve said it Three Railway Engines yet our compulsion to go on trying. This novel is a mix of dystopia with fantasy elements and bildungsroman We start in the future where we come across a dysfunctional group of pseudo cognoscenti hanging out in a local cinema cum coffee shop called The Elite In this section of the book Lanark our hero lives a rather purposeless life in Unthank parallel universe Glasgow cavorts with these layabouts there before being sucked underground by a giant pair of lips There he enters a vast Orwellian compound known as The Institute where everyone s a doctor or becomes one He saves a woman Rima one of the layabouts from turning salamander He discovers that Soylent Green is people and for that reason decides to leave the subterreanean Institute and return to the hell of life on the surface of the earth But before doing so he is told the story of his former life as one Duncan Thaw by a portable oracle Thaw lived in the real Glasgow which I was pleased to see meticulously described for the first time in any fiction that I have ever read Over than 300 pages Thaw grows from child to neurotic art student He has terrible asthma He masturbates avidly He can t get a girl His mother dies horribly His relationship with his father is deeply moving The relationships throughout these two central books are so genuine so vivid This human warmth is an element lacking from the framing dystopia because that setting and all its whacky goings on distract from the humanity as it s meant to do But the dystopic sections are valuable for other reasons for their depiction of vast illogical space of an incomprehensible and deeply criminal military industrial complex that will stop at nothing to realize a profit Multiple rereadings are merited That s high praise A masterpiece There I ve said it

characters ã PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB free ☆ Alasdair Gray

Free download Lanark A Life in Four Books ä PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB free This work originally published in 1981 has been hailed as the most influential Scottish novel of. Alien Life forms Lanark on the face of it is a complex fantasy of a sort of Glaswegian student Bohemia experienced by the eponymous hero alias Thaw There are intriguing allusions and dense metaphysical comments on almost every page I don t think it is prudent or even possible to summarize its narrative or its meaning But a key to both might be found in what I think is its philosophical and therefore essentially literary contextAccording to some the most serious impediment to explaining the world isn t the absence of a unified physical theory or the inadeuacy of human language It is the presence of what can only be called a pervasive evil Evil is an irrationality an inherent contradiction which clearly exists in nature everywhere and especially in people but which defies explanation Yet consciousness demands one How can such an absurd universe produce beings who uestion its very absurdity This is the premise and issue of an ancient style of thinking called Gnosticism the essential presumption of which is that we thinking reflective beings actually don t belong here We have been exiled from elsewhere and are condemned to wander aimlessly in this universe of hopelessness pain disease death and well evil until we are rescued from it and returned to whence we came This view is expressed in too many diverse ways to be called a philosophy but it does have an historical continuity that reflects its intellectual and emotional powerChristianity and conseuently Christian culture is tinged with gnostic influences from its inception but has always rejected the gnostic mode of thinking as unbiblical in its presumption of the essential evil of the world we inhabit Christianity does however maintain somewhat paradoxically the idea that there is a better place which is our true home This it calls Paradise a realm close to God with no pain no disease and no death that is a place without evil Gnosticism has been suppressed by Christianity and also by Islam as a heresy But it reappears freuently in European history in various forms usually among those who take the problem of evil seriously The early Desert Fathers and strange stylites sitters on poles and other martyrs to the flesh are examples as are the medieval Cathars and Bogomils and their spiritual heirs the strict Calvinists and the even enthusiastic adherents of the Republican Party in the United States Each of these groups has their own version of a spiritual theory of the world in which escape from the tribulations of living is not only possible but constitutes the real goal of living at allThe historical originators of Gnosticism were the Manichaeans Persian followers of the sage Mani who developed a rather elaborate and empirically based theory of human existence Look up in the night sky they said and you will see clearly that there is another world beyond that enclosed by the solid vault of heaven Those points of light we call stars are actually holes imperfections in that vault the casing of our world through which we can see bits of the world beyond That is the realm of light whence we came and to which we are meant according to cosmic logic to return The real mission and spiritual duty of all human beings is to seek the knowledge by which such a home going can be achievedAs proof that such a re unification with the domain of light is possible the Manichaeans again pointed to the night sky In addition to the fixed points of light there were several wandering objects called planets The function of these objects is to patrol our world on the lookout for the sparks of light that is to say human souls which have managed to detach themselves through secret knowledge from the evil bonds of the Earth These sparks are scooped up by the roving planets as the sparks emerge from their earthly prisonAnd as further proof if proof were necessary the planets then deposit their luminous cargo periodically onto that other celestial body we call the Moon Thus the monthly waxing of the Moon as these sparks are added to it And also the monthly discharge of these from the Moon its waning through the vault of heaven as they are merged with the infinite light beyond As far as spiritual theories of the world go this is relatively plausible Little wonder then that its principle tropes Light and Freedom appear periodically in European literature Lanark is an example Its characters are obsessed with light either finding it or avoiding it Lanark s goal is to escape from the realm of artificial light into that of pure heavenly light Others Lanark observes have obviously succeeded they have disappeared when the lights go out This is a risky business On the one hand the only cure for these personal diseases is sunlight On the other hand When people leave without a companion their diseases return after a while So the problem of reunification is not just cosmic as the Manichaeans thought it is also personal and involves relationships with others We re in it together Therefore Lanark s plan is simple I m leaving when I find a suitable companion Why I want the sun Of course the extended metaphor of Lanark communicates the secret gnostic knowledge of the light but such knowledge is in itself insufficient Metaphor is one of thought s most essential tools It illuminates what would otherwise be totally obscure But the illumination is sometimes so bright that it dazzles instead of revealing as one of the characters points out Lanark knows that what s necessary above all is a very specific sort of courage Admit he told himself You watched the sky because you were too cowardly to know people I doubt anything can explain Lanark satisfactorily except Lanark But I do think its gnostic pedigree might add something significant to the comprehensibility of its otherwise alien life forms